Author Topic: Sheila's first rifle load:  (Read 732 times)

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Offline lookout

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Re: Sheila's first rifle load:
« Reply #90 on: October 13, 2019, 05:13:PM »
Also, genuine MOJ are few and far between.




Genuine or not there must be about 700 waiting to be assessed, so what's happened that it's arrived at this state ?

Offline Caroline

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Re: Sheila's first rifle load:
« Reply #91 on: October 13, 2019, 05:21:PM »



Genuine or not there must be about 700 waiting to be assessed, so what's happened that it's arrived at this state ?

Not sure where you got that figure but if people won't admit to being guilty when they are, then it's their fault the system is clogged!
Few people have the imagination for reality

Offline petey

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Re: Sheila's first rifle load:
« Reply #92 on: October 13, 2019, 05:25:PM »
For the handful who were sadly, wrongly hanged there certainly have been many more which have been MOJ's over the years for all the technology etc.
There shouldn't be such things as MOJ's if investigations were carried out properly and appropriately.

I’m not sure you have a realistic understanding of why miscarriages of justice occur. There are many potential reasons, often depending on the complexity of the case material and complexity of the evidence involved. Carrying out investigations ‘properly and appropriately’ is only a very small part. Trial by jury is an adversarial process. The case may have been investigated 100%  ‘properly and appropriately,’ but a poor performance by counsel, poor performance under cross examination from defendants, poor evidence by witnesses....... and quite easily verdicts can be reached which lead to claims that they are a miscarriage of justice.


Offline petey

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Re: Sheila's first rifle load:
« Reply #93 on: October 13, 2019, 05:28:PM »
A worrying statistic is of all the cases which are brought to the CCRC, 40% of these are erroneously brought and are struck out immediately. This is one factor in why so much time is taken up with time wasted  on these cases.

Equally, the CCRC have a budget of only £5 million per year. Most commissioners only work 1 (ONE) day per week. Is it any wonder that cases take so long to process.

Offline Caroline

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Re: Sheila's first rifle load:
« Reply #94 on: October 13, 2019, 05:28:PM »
I’m not sure you have a realistic understanding of why miscarriages of justice occur. There are many potential reasons, often depending on the complexity of the case material and complexity of the evidence involved. Carrying out investigations ‘properly and appropriately’ is only a very small part. Trial by jury is an adversarial process. The case may have been investigated 100%  ‘properly and appropriately,’ but a poor performance by counsel, poor performance under cross examination from defendants, poor evidence by witnesses....... and quite easily verdicts can be reached which lead to claims that they are a miscarriage of justice.

Hi Petey, apparently, all you need to a 'gut feeling'  ;)
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Offline Jane

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Re: Sheila's first rifle load:
« Reply #95 on: October 13, 2019, 05:29:PM »
Interestingly my daughter works with " older " cops and by all accounts I'm on the same wave-length as they are with thoughts on certain subjects of law being very similar. One's a dog-handler.
 On the other side of the coin is a much younger officer who's ready to arrest anyone without a second thought. He'll never learn ! Over zealousness is never good.


Yes, I imagine it would be. The training received by older policemen -interestingly, it was probably they who formed the body of the groundwork investigation at WHF. Certainly my friend's late husband would have been of their number and he'd have been 79 this year- would be vastly different from the training received by today's recruits. I can't help but feel the "arrest first, ask questions later" school of thought might be about self preservation. It must be quite difficult to know who's just a tearaway and who's a potential terrorist. Either way, they're likely to be armed.

Offline Caroline

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Re: Sheila's first rifle load:
« Reply #96 on: October 13, 2019, 05:31:PM »
A worrying statistic is of all the cases which are brought to the CCRC, 40% of these are erroneously brought and are struck out immediately. This is one factor in why so much time is taken up with time wasted  on these cases.

Equally, the CCRC have a budget of only £5 million per year. Most commissioners only work 1 (ONE) day per week. Is it any wonder that cases take so long to process.

Exactly, Bamber has had his fair share of submissions - which of course he is entitled to. However, if recent submissions include the guff about the phone bass (as recently posted), that will be yet another one cluttering up the pile!
Few people have the imagination for reality

Offline petey

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Re: Sheila's first rifle load:
« Reply #97 on: October 13, 2019, 05:41:PM »
I attended the United against Injustice conference in Liverpool on Saturday, where it was fascinating listening to supporters of potential miscarriage of justice cases, including jb, as well as a presentation from the CCRC.

Offline lookout

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Re: Sheila's first rifle load:
« Reply #98 on: October 13, 2019, 05:51:PM »
I would have gone to that conference as it's only across the water from me but I had a celebration to attend. I wanted to see how Barry George got on with his speech.

Offline petey

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Re: Sheila's first rifle load:
« Reply #99 on: October 13, 2019, 05:56:PM »
I spoke briefly with Barry George and his sister also spoke. He came across reasonably engaging

Offline lookout

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Re: Sheila's first rifle load:
« Reply #100 on: October 13, 2019, 06:14:PM »
Oh, very good.

Offline petey

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Re: Sheila's first rifle load:
« Reply #101 on: October 13, 2019, 08:01:PM »
One of the hardest cases to hear was a man who erroneously served 19 years for murder before his conviction was overturned and he was freed immediately. When he received compensation for his wrongful conviction, £75,000 was then deducted for ‘board and lodging’ for his time spent in prison. (Sadly this is not a joke)

Offline Jane

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Re: Sheila's first rifle load:
« Reply #102 on: October 13, 2019, 08:11:PM »
One of the hardest cases to hear was a man who erroneously served 19 years for murder before his conviction was overturned and he was freed immediately. When he received compensation for his wrongful conviction, £75,000 was then deducted for ‘board and lodging’ for his time spent in prison. (Sadly this is not a joke)


OMG. When it comes to black humour, that has to top the list. Is there nothing he can do? Shouldn't that particular bill be paid by those who put him there? But then who is ultimately responsible for that? You've already listed a few.

Offline Caroline

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Re: Sheila's first rifle load:
« Reply #103 on: October 14, 2019, 12:15:AM »
One of the hardest cases to hear was a man who erroneously served 19 years for murder before his conviction was overturned and he was freed immediately. When he received compensation for his wrongful conviction, £75,000 was then deducted for ‘board and lodging’ for his time spent in prison. (Sadly this is not a joke)


That's disgraceful and in need of protest!
Few people have the imagination for reality

Offline Jan

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Re: Sheila's first rifle load:
« Reply #104 on: October 23, 2019, 06:03:PM »
One of the hardest cases to hear was a man who erroneously served 19 years for murder before his conviction was overturned and he was freed immediately. When he received compensation for his wrongful conviction, £75,000 was then deducted for ‘board and lodging’ for his time spent in prison. (Sadly this is not a joke)

That is shocking. After 19 years getting back to a normal life will be difficult without feeling like you have been kicked in the teeth by the system again .