Author Topic: JAMES BELL - there are some who believe that he was responsible for whf tragedy  (Read 1564 times)

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Offline mike tesko

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Was he the scruffy looking hunched man seen walking away from the farmhouse about an hour after the police first arrived at the scene?
"Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when we first practice to deceive"...

Offline mike tesko

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Neville Bamber and James Bell were no strangers to eachother...
"Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when we first practice to deceive"...

Offline mike tesko

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Rumour has it that on one occasion when both clashed in public, that James Bell supposedly threatened Neville Bamber and his family by blurting out 'the next time we meet, or talk, it will be with you at the end of a guns barrel'...
« Last Edit: December 04, 2018, 12:12:PM by mike tesko »
"Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when we first practice to deceive"...

Offline mike tesko

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Rumour has it that on one occasion when both clashed in public, that James Bell supposedly threatened Neville Bamber and his family by blurting out 'the next time we meet, or talk, it will be with you at the end of a guns barrel'...

Neville Bamber was an airman during the 2nd World War, and Bell was jailed for 6 months, as a result of 4 airmen drawing lots to see who would have sex with his young wife, whilst she waited expectantly in a toilet!
"Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when we first practice to deceive"...

Offline Adam

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James Bell committing the massacre would explain why Nevill got so badly beaten. Sheila's biological mother could not have inflicted those injuries.
'Only I know what really happened that night'.

Offline mike tesko

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https://www.news.com.au/news/village-trials/news-story/294dc3786c4da3a5707244333cc807d6

Village trials

IF someone were to describe Finchingfield in north Essex, there would be mention of its Norman church, windmill, cosy pubs and neat rows of terraced houses. More? There's the duck pond on the village green and tearooms selling sticky buns. One of Britain's most photographed villages, its image has ended up on tea towels, calendars, postcards, even chocolate boxes.

Go to its north to discover the real beauty of the county of Essex, advises Stephanie Clifford-Smith

September 28, 20099:14pm

IF someone were to describe Finchingfield in north Essex, there would be mention of its Norman church, windmill, cosy pubs and neat rows of terraced houses. More? There's the duck pond on the village green and tearooms selling sticky buns. One of Britain's most photographed villages, its image has ended up on tea towels, calendars, postcards, even chocolate boxes.

When Bill Bryson came over all misty at the thought of leaving Britain in Notes from a Small Island, he wrote about the extraordinarily rich architectural heritage of the country with 445,000 listed buildings and 12,000 medieval churches. Places such as Finchingfield and the surrounding villages contribute in no small way to the tally because this pocket of north Essex was one of the wealthiest parts of Britain until the 18th century. Weaving and cloth production during the Middle Ages flooded the area with money, much of which was spent on stately homes and churches.

But it's not the glorious architecture that springs to many minds at the mention of Essex. Some Britons will snigger and follow up with a crude joke about the locals, including their estuarine accent, a form of cockney from counties near the Thames Estuary. Essex's poor reputation comes from its south, where the arcades in tacky seaside towns such as Southend host local hoods and clones of Vicky Pollard, the bolshie blonde teenager of Little Britain fame. The concrete multistorey car parks and the so-called new towns of Basildon and South Woodham Ferrers, built after World War II to house London workers, haven't done the county any favours either.

A GRUESOME HISTORY THAT'S WORTHY OF A TELEVISION WHODUNIT COGGESHALL has all the makings of a cracking episode of the popular television show Midsomer Murders. The town has a bustling market square, gift and antique shops heady with potpourri, rows of pretty gelato-toned houses and a gruesome history of sinister and violent deaths.

A woman was hanged here in 1699, in one of England's last recorded witch trials. The deaths of hundreds of men, women and children following trials on Market Hill are what many say caused "the curse of Coggeshall", while others put it down to the town's position on the intersection of two ley lines. These lines have no scientific foundation but are believed by the paranormally inclined to be threads of energy that join ancient monuments and the sites of pagan rituals, causing disruptive influences wherever they cross.

Whatever you believe, things turned very nasty here and there was a time in the 1980s when cabbies took fares to the town only reluctantly. The disappearance of 35-year-old Diane Jones in 1983 was the beginning of a wave of incidents that spooked the nation and had the tabloids in a lather. She'd been seen arguing with her husband, Robert, the town doctor, in the pub the night she disappeared. Police questioned him for 55 hours and dug up his garden but finding nothing let him go. Her battered body was found three months later in a forest in Suffolk. No one was charged with the murder.

In 1985, millionaire antique dealer Wilfred Bull shot his wife, Patsy, with an antique musket when she challenged him about his infidelity and demanded a divorce. That same year, at nearby Tolleshunt D'Arcy, Jeremy Bamber killed his adoptive parents, sister and her children to avoid sharing a pound stg. 500,000 inheritance. The following year, when the wife of local farmer and champion clay pigeon shooter Jimmy Bell left him, he shot her, then turned the gun on himself. Then, in 1988, restaurateur Peter Langan doused himself in petrol and set himself alight in the marital bedroom when his wife asked for a divorce.

He died seven weeks later.


You won't find any of that in the travel brochures. What you will find are less ghoulish reasons to visit, such as the 16th-century timber-framed house Paycockes, the 15th-century parish church of St Peter ad Vincula and Grange Barn, the oldest surviving timber-framed barn in Europe.

If you want to include Coggeshall on the trip suggested in the main feature, start there before heading east to Finchingfield.

Stephanie Clifford-Smith

Up in its rural north, however, near Cambridgeshire and Suffolk, things are different. Try this road trip, easily achievable in a day. All these places offer accommodation if you want to stretch it out; Essex is a little more than an hour northeast of London and Cambridge is nearby.

Finchingfield: Part of this little town's charm is its topography. The Norman church of St John the Baptist sits at the top of the village surrounded by a graveyard with ancient worn stones and the church tower, with its eight bells, marks the village's high point. A footpath winds up to and around the church from the road, so the building seems to unfold as you approach it obliquely. In the same way, Church Hill, the road in from the east, winds down to the green, past 15th- century houses and the Red Lion pub, one of those low-ceilinged places with a roaring fire.

Most of the plastered buildings are white (it goes so well with the ducks) but the occasional splash of pale blue, baby pink or, on the tearoom doors, an almost fluoro yellow breaks up the palette. Walk up the Causeway heading north and check out the 18th-century timber windmill.

Thaxted: If you've hankered to watch morris men, those wacky dancers in white, strewn with bells, ribbons and flowers, Thaxted could be the place to do it. The Thaxted morris men perform here on weekends throughout the summer, jigging, waving white hankies and rattling their knee bells, generally after a good spell at the local pub. If you miss the dancers you can always wander around the town, which has more big architectural tickets than most places this size. Start in the town centre and amid the rows of well-preserved Georgian shopfronts you'll find a house once occupied by British composer Gustav Holst. This is where he began writing The Planets orchestral suite, much of which has been used in films including Star Wars.

A bit farther along there's the medieval half-timbered Guildhall leaning out into the street from an open courtyard. Begun in 1390, it's still used for meetings and exhibitions. Walk up the hill to the 14th-century church, also called St John the Baptist, which, thanks to its spire, you can see from everywhere. There's a grassy path that takes you past the old almshouses, which look like gingerbread cottages, to John Webb's Windmill (1804). Picnic on the lawn beneath it or visit the museum inside.

Saffron Walden: There are a couple of distinctive characteristics of this small market town: it has never been sacked or burned so there are many well-preserved layers of history on show, especially in its centre. The other feature is that, although, like other towns in the area where wool production brought riches in medieval times, Saffron Walden got another cash injection in the 16th and 17th centuries from a healthy saffron industry. Until that time the place was known as Chipping Walden.

The town centre is predominantly medieval, which means there's a market square, with cheap fruit and vegetables, narrow cobbled streets and half-timbered buildings. If you're wondering why the town hall seems to be in such good condition for a medieval building, it's because it's not one. It was built in that style, presumably to fit in with surrounding structures, but not until 1769 and, being the civic centre, has had money thrown at it since to keep it looking good.

Walk up the hill from the square to visit the 15th-century St Mary the Virgin, the largest parish church in Essex. The lack of good local stone has meant many such buildings were clad in flint and, more commonly in domestic buildings, decorative plaster known as pargetting. North Essex is famous for it. Just across from the church is the Fry Gallery, which represents the Great Bardfield group of artists, Edward Bawden and Eric Ravilious among the most prominent. And if you like a maze that's interesting as well as easy to cheat try the turf maze on the common.

Clavering: Pronounced Clay-vering, this little village has become most famous as the place where Jamie Oliver grew up and, while his parents still run the local pub, The Cricketers (which does excellent food), there are other reasons to visit. It's very pretty, very rural and if you love walking it's ideal. The village green, where cricket matches are held throughout summer, looks like a fuzzy felt picture with bright little buildings dotted around its edges. From this open space lead public footpaths that run through Clavering and beyond, tracing timbered forests and open fields.

Continue past the green heading west to find the Norman church of StMary and St Clement. On the way you'll see houses with mossy, steeply pitched roofs and you'll pass through a kissing gate (to keep out livestock). The green blanket of the churchyard with its gravestones and yew trees creates a quiet breathing space as you approach the grey flint-clad building. The nave is spacious, punctuated by columns and monuments. Stand at the front and it's all cool, stone tones but from behind, hand-worked tapestry kneelers lined up along the pew backs introduce splashes of colour...
« Last Edit: December 05, 2018, 09:36:AM by mike tesko »
"Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when we first practice to deceive"...

Offline mike tesko

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I believe there could well be a tenuous link between the murders in the Diane Jones (July 1983), whf (August 1985) and the murder of Augusta Bell (September 1986) - at the heart of this presentation is the madman millionaire James Bell who committed suicide after shooting his young 22 year old wife dead...
« Last Edit: December 05, 2018, 10:10:AM by mike tesko »
"Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when we first practice to deceive"...

Offline mike tesko

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I believe there could well be a tenuous link between the murders in the Diane Jones (July 1983), whf (August 1985) and the murder of Augusta Bell (September 1986) - at the heart of this presentation is the madman millionaire James Bell who committed suicide after shooting his young 22 year old wife dead...

I am now having repeated nightmares concerning this case, being linked with the other two - so much so, that I have felt compelled to look into the circumstances of all three investigations. So far, I have made a number of alarming discoveries, which instinctively lead me to believe that James Bell, was responsible for the Diane Jones murder, and the murders of Neville Bamber, June Bamber, Daniel Caffell, Nicholas Caffell, and the murder of his young wife, Auguste Bell - he did not kill Sheila because the police were responsible for doing that / this, when a training exercise went wrong, which was being carried out with the body of Sheila (unconscious) insitu on the bedroom floor!

I have realised a series of common threads which I believe link all three murders together, which points the finger of suspicion at James Bell being the murderer of Diane Jones, and the Bamber family (excluding Sheila), and his own wife...
« Last Edit: December 05, 2018, 10:49:AM by mike tesko »
"Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when we first practice to deceive"...

Offline mike tesko

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The nightmares I am having come at an alarming rate and frequency, I keep seeing the images of Diane Jones, June Bamber, and Auguste Bell, I am being told 'all these people, it's the same person', at first I couldn't understand how these three individuals could be the same person because their lives crossed over, and into, and beyond one or other of them. The first to die, had been Diane Jones (July 1983), the second to die, June Bamber (August 1985), the third to die, Auguste Bell (September 1986), but at one time or another, all three of these victims had lived at the same time as the other two, and vice versa. They all had lived at one time or another close to eachother, in Essex..
« Last Edit: December 05, 2018, 10:58:AM by mike tesko »
"Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when we first practice to deceive"...

Offline mike tesko

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The nightmares I am having come at an alarming rate and frequency, I keep seeing the images of Diane Jones, June Bamber, and Auguste Bell, I am being told 'all these people, it's the same person', at first I couldn't understand how these three individuals could be the same person because their lives crossed over, and into, and beyond one or other of them. The first to die, had been Diane Jones (July 1983), the second to die, June Bamber (August 1985), the third to die, Auguste Bell (September 1986), but at one time or another, all three of these victims had lived at the same time as the other two, and vice versa. They all had lived at one time or another close to eachother, in Essex..

Here look at these (images) it's been images like these that I keep seeing in my nightmares, accompanied by a eerie male voice which keeps telling me, 'all these people, it's the same person', the frequency with which I am having these reoccurring nightmares is leaving me totally warn out and tired. How can all these three people, be the same person? It was bugging me, until it suddenly dawned on me the other night, it was in the middle of the night when I awoken at a reoccurrence of the same nightmare, James Bell, James Bell, James Bell...

Diane Jones murdered July 1983
June Bamber murdered August 1985
Auguste Bell murdered September 1986

James Bells former wife Janet, who he assaulted and was imprisoned for?
« Last Edit: December 05, 2018, 11:59:AM by mike tesko »
"Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when we first practice to deceive"...

Offline mike tesko

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Detective Chief Supt' Ainsley was personally involved in all three investigations!
"Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when we first practice to deceive"...

Offline mike tesko

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Diane Jones was understood to have been two months pregnant at the time she was murdered...

Sheila Caffell was spared her life in the Bamber family shootings, only to be killed in a training exercise which went dramatically wrong!

Auguste Bell fled James farmhouse after her mother had taken their child away back to Norfolk, followed by Auguste, herself - James Bell filled her toNirfolj shot her dead then killed himself...
"Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when we first practice to deceive"...

Offline nugnug

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    • http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&ved=0CDMQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fjohnnyvoid.wordpress.com%2F&ei=WTdUUo3IM6mY0QWYz4GADg&usg=AFQjCNE-8xtZuPAZ52VkntYOokH5da5MIA&bvm=bv.5353710
i dont see how he could of been how culd he of got ut with the police how could he have phoned and pretend tobe nevile and why would he want to.

he know he may of had a grudge agianst but it would be a bit drastic to kill his entire family over it.

Offline mike tesko

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i dont see how he could of been how culd he of got ut with the police how could he have phoned and pretend tobe nevile and why would he want to. he could have pretended to be Neville, in order to lure him to the farm so that Bell could also kill Jeremy...

he know he may of had a grudge agianst Whoever bludgeoned Diane Jones to death would also have been considered to be somewhat drastic action too, and of course when Bell followed his wife to Norfolk, he shot her to death, and followed this by shooting himself dead, which can also be looked upon as being somewhat drastic action! but it would be a bit drastic to kill his entire family over it ok thanks for your opinion, but seems to me that whoever murdered Diane Jones, also knew that she was pregnant, either with the child of a liver, or their own child - at least that would be the approach I would have taken had I been investigating that / this murder! Surely, they could have got the unborn Childs DNA to see whether or not, Dr Jones (the husband) was it could have been the father!  Seems to me that all of the three different murder investigations which I have drawn together in this thread, all have something in common, and that is it was that Diane JONES and My e Bamber and Auguste Bell all looked similar in appearance to one another, and all were having problems with either being or becoming unexpectedly pregnant as in Diane Jones case, to being concerned about the well being of Sheila and the care of her grandchildren in the case of June Bamber, to the snatching away of Auguste Bells child by her mother who took the child away to Norfolk, which in turn sparked off the leaving of James Bell by his wife, who fled to her mother's home in Norfolk to be with her child, only to be pursued all the way there by James Bell and shot to death, followed by James Bell turning the gun upon himself! Seems to me to have been a common thread linking all these three murder investigations together with James Bell at the hub of all three murders! Note, how there was a child, or children mixed up or embroiled in the build up to all these murders!

Essex police looked at the possible involvement of James Bell in the whf murders, and it may be more than just a coincidence that James Bells initials are 'JB', considering the contents of the suicide note, which has the alphabetic letters 'G'(give),  'J'(James), 'C'(call), ' F'(first), rather than what was previously thought to be a reference to 'G'(get),  'J'(Jeremy), [to] 'C'(come ), [to]' F'(farm)..
« Last Edit: December 05, 2018, 01:10:PM by mike tesko »
"Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when we first practice to deceive"...

Offline mike tesko

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We also know that in 1982, or there about a that there as some sort of a confrontation inside the magistrates court when Neville Bamber sent somebody to prison, and this incident, whichever it was or how it had happenned led into a confrontation in public where James Bell threw a handful of bullets at Neville Bamber and threatened him by supposedly or allegedly shouting something along the lines of, ' the next time we meet, it will be with you at the end of the barrel of my gun'! Now, I can't for sure say that these things did happen, but it's what I've been told, and of course there is also the teneous link with the incident when James Bells wife is supposed to have locked herself away in a toilet at a nearby airbase whilst four airmen drew lots to see who would have sex with her first! According to evidence given at the court hearing which resulted in Bell being convicted and sent to prison, he made his wife walk around with four toilet seats around her neck in public - so their is also the RAF link, and who knows whether or not James Bell thought that Neville Bamber was either involved in someway, of that he had put the four airmen up to it? Basically put in any event this chap James Bell was a loose cannon, waiting to go off!

I can't help wondering if the time of year when all these murders took place, had also got something to do with it - July, August, and September (Summer season), time of harvesting of crops? James Bell and Neville Bamber, both farmers, both members of the local organisation known as 'Maldon farm fruit growers' I think 'Ltd' but I could be wrong at this stage!
« Last Edit: December 05, 2018, 01:24:PM by mike tesko »
"Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when we first practice to deceive"...