Author Topic: Making a Murderer (Netflix)  (Read 3145 times)

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Offline Caroline

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Re: Making a Murderer (Netflix)
« Reply #30 on: January 13, 2016, 07:17:AM »
Wouldn't normally do this but it is his official page on FB and people are commenting on the case. https://www.facebook.com/governorscottwalker

It seems Mr Walker has his mind on other things - his OWN career http://www.jsonline.com/news/statepolitics/scott-walker-290106981.html

A place to send objections etc. http://walker.wi.gov/
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Offline Stephanie

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Re: Making a Murderer (Netflix)
« Reply #31 on: January 13, 2016, 08:38:AM »
What stands out to me is that the police officers involved in the case, when questioned on the stand - they all appear guilty of something...?
« Last Edit: January 13, 2016, 08:43:AM by stephanie »
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Offline mat

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Re: Making a Murderer (Netflix)
« Reply #32 on: January 13, 2016, 09:52:AM »
What stands out to me is that the police officers involved in the case, when questioned on the stand - they all appear guilty of something...?

The police officers all seem to have great memory recall on the stand don't they? Until they are asked something that they don't like. Then they have sudden memory loss. I didn't like Colburn having no idea why he called dispatch with TH's license number. He remembered everything else apart from that, suddenly he was clueless.

Offline Stephanie

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Re: Making a Murderer (Netflix)
« Reply #33 on: January 13, 2016, 10:49:AM »
Okay I've watched up to episode 8 now. And will watch the other two later tonight, aswell as the Judge Janine special I Sky+'d on Fox News the other night.

I have worries on both sides.

I am alarmed that LENK, LENK, LENK appeared on all important dates. He wasn't meant to be invovled in the investigation but he was there at all the crucial times in the investigation, the key, the blood, the bullet.

Colburns call about the vehicle reg, gave me goosebumps.  A good argument can be made that he found the vehicle when he made that call. Where was he when he called? Why was he calling? MORE should have been made of it on the stand.

EDTA was a crock of shit. When you have a substance that is so notorious at not being able to be found in blood, that testing is stopped on it all together, then I don't think re-starting testing after a decade and saying "Oh our test found none" should be taken seriously.  However, the FBI agent who gave the results on the stand came across as a better and more believeable witness than the expert the defence put on the stand - that was a failure of the defence.

I think the original burn site was the quarry. The defence did a great job in changing the medical experts mind on the stand in front of the jury, she was at first adament that the burn site was behind Steven's house, she however changed her mind and said she couldn't say for sure. The defence should have followed that up with a question of "Why have you changed your mind and can no longer say for sure that you believe the original burn site?" Just anything to cement the complete 360 on the stand.

However, the documentary was made in conjunction with Steven's lawyers so I do think that is worth remembering, I am hesitant to take everything at face value and in the back of my mind I think that if the Bamber supporters made a documentary they could put their own spin on it, as we know they would, so there is a chance this has happened - although I do see it as seemingly an open and honest look at the case.

But if I was on the jury, I would NOT find him guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, not even close.

So I am dis-heartened that he is in prison for this crime and I hope that the documentary helps to highlight his case and get it looked into properly, fairly and openly.

I've not watched all episodes yet but what I have watched doesn't sit right with me.

I have to say I agree with you regarding Lenk, Colburn, the EDTA test... Why was the seal broken on the vial of blood? How and why was there a tiny hole in the purple lid? But then wasn't Avery's sweat found of the Rav4?

So much doesn't add up. Watching Brenden Dassy's coerced interview with Len's investigator and listening to his calls with his mum really bothered me. He appears to have learning difficulties, as one of Steve Avery's lawyers points out. I imagine the Judge hadn't seen the interview before he made the decision to allow it as evidence?


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Offline Jan

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Re: Making a Murderer (Netflix)
« Reply #34 on: January 14, 2016, 06:52:PM »
Make sure you all come back when you have watched all the episodes then we can discuss.

Offline mat

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Re: Making a Murderer (Netflix)
« Reply #35 on: January 15, 2016, 08:32:AM »
I've finished. I think  Dassey is innocent. No matter whether Steven turns out to be guilty or not guilty, I beilieve 100% his nephew is innocent and I found the parts of the documentary that deat with his nephews trial extremely uncomfortable to watch.

Offline Jan

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Re: Making a Murderer (Netflix)
« Reply #36 on: January 15, 2016, 05:37:PM »
I've finished. I think  Dassey is innocent. No matter whether Steven turns out to be guilty or not guilty, I beilieve 100% his nephew is innocent and I found the parts of the documentary that deat with his nephews trial extremely uncomfortable to watch.

me too . my best friend has a special needs son - probably worse than Dassey because he can not read or write but you could talk him into anything - he also gets very scared very easily and I kept thinking of him. It was so sad. I felt very emotional when he was found guilty.

My questions are - How did the prosecution explain how there was no DNA at all from the victim on the key?
It was pretty obvious the key was planted so why could they not accept the rest of the evidence was?

What was the prosecutions explanation for the number plate being checked after the day that the murder was supposed to happen?

Why did the jury accept the crime scene had been cleaned when it was obvious it had not been cleaned at all ?

They had searched the garage very thoroughly so why did they not find the bullet?

How did they explain the syringe hole in the blood sample?

Why did no one see those bones being moved ( apparently evidence has now come forward that that fire would not have resulted in the bones ending up like they did)

Why did her flat mate not report her missing earlier?

Who thought the cousin who gave evidence was a bit creepy - could he be the culprit ?

And if you were the brother and you had seen that evidence would you not have had a tiny bit of doubt about both convictions ? Just a tiny bit?



Offline Sparkle

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Re: Making a Murderer (Netflix)
« Reply #37 on: January 15, 2016, 08:03:PM »
I've finished. I think  Dassey is innocent. No matter whether Steven turns out to be guilty or not guilty, I beilieve 100% his nephew is innocent and I found the parts of the documentary that deat with his nephews trial extremely uncomfortable to watch.

Yep. Brendan Dassey reminds me of my son at times. My child is eight years old. While my little dude is far more intelligent than Dassey (typical mother eh!), he has this need to please people, and say the right thing - especially where men are concerned. It worried me to watch a teenager be interrogated and my first comparison to be to an eight year old on the autistic spectrum. Broke my heart watching that lad be interrogated. All the kid wanted was to get back to school and his mum, they should never have been allowed to question him like that.


Offline mat

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Re: Making a Murderer (Netflix)
« Reply #39 on: January 15, 2016, 10:29:PM »
Yep. Brendan Dassey reminds me of my son at times. My child is eight years old. While my little dude is far more intelligent than Dassey (typical mother eh!), he has this need to please people, and say the right thing - especially where men are concerned. It worried me to watch a teenager be interrogated and my first comparison to be to an eight year old on the autistic spectrum. Broke my heart watching that lad be interrogated. All the kid wanted was to get back to school and his mum, they should never have been allowed to question him like that.

They really shouldn't have. He clearly didn't know what he was saying, he was saying what he thought they wanted to hear. His story didn't even match the story the prosecution gave as evidence. MAde even worse that he was let down by his lawyer who arranged for him to be investigated alone later on down the line, and even though the judge removed the lawyer from his case for doing this  - it shocks me that the information obtained during that interview was still allowed to be used.


me too . my best friend has a special needs son - probably worse than Dassey because he can not read or write but you could talk him into anything - he also gets very scared very easily and I kept thinking of him. It was so sad. I felt very emotional when he was found guilty.

My questions are - How did the prosecution explain how there was no DNA at all from the victim on the key?
It was pretty obvious the key was planted so why could they not accept the rest of the evidence was?
They didn't accept that it was planter though. They claim that there was no victims DNA on there because Steven cleaned it, which is why only his DNA was on there

What was the prosecutions explanation for the number plate being checked after the day that the murder was supposed to happen?

I'd like to know this too, I do believe it was answered, it had to have been but whatrever the answer wasn't incuded in the show.

Why did the jury accept the crime scene had been cleaned when it was obvious it had not been cleaned at all ?
I've read up on the case more - and apparently Dassey said they bleached the garage floor which is where they say the murder happened, Dassey went home that night with bleach on his jeans according to his mother, although I am hesitent to believe this.

They had searched the garage very thoroughly so why did they not find the bullet?

How did they explain the syringe hole in the blood sample?
There MUST have been an explanation... we just didn't hear it, I am going to try and read up on this.
Why did no one see those bones being moved ( apparently evidence has now come forward that that fire would not have resulted in the bones ending up like they did)

Why did her flat mate not report her missing earlier?

Who thought the cousin who gave evidence was a bit creepy - could he be the culprit ?

And if you were the brother and you had seen that evidence would you not have had a tiny bit of doubt about both convictions ? Just a tiny bit?

I can't say that I found the cousin of Avery, or the brother of the vicitm... too normal. I wouldn't be shocked if a third party all together, that wasn't Avaery or Dassey, was responsible and the story took a HUGE twist.


Offline Jan

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Re: Making a Murderer (Netflix)
« Reply #40 on: January 15, 2016, 11:16:PM »
if the bones had been moved from the quarry and perhaps the body was burnt in the incinerator then it could have been someone very close.

It is a very interesting case - and the prejudice against him even casting doubt on the first MOJ was very uncomfortable.

Do you think Avery should have testified?

Offline mat

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Re: Making a Murderer (Netflix)
« Reply #41 on: January 15, 2016, 11:22:PM »
if the bones had been moved from the quarry and perhaps the body was burnt in the incinerator then it could have been someone very close.

It is a very interesting case - and the prejudice against him even casting doubt on the first MOJ was very uncomfortable.

Do you think Avery should have testified?

No not at all. Do you?

Offline Stephanie

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Re: Making a Murderer (Netflix)
« Reply #42 on: January 15, 2016, 11:47:PM »
Why did no one see those bones being moved ( apparently evidence has now come forward that that fire would not have resulted in the bones ending up like they did)

I've still yet to watch all episodes but you've raised a good point here imo.....

Found this.. http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/tv/news/making-a-murderer-all-the-evidence-against-steven-avery-the-netflic-show-missed-out-a6807961.html

And this... (Bone evidence) http://www.rollingstone.com/tv/news/making-a-murderer-steven-averys-lawyer-on-the-evidence-left-out-20160115
« Last Edit: January 15, 2016, 11:56:PM by stephanie »
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Offline Jan

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Re: Making a Murderer (Netflix)
« Reply #43 on: January 15, 2016, 11:57:PM »
No not at all. Do you?

Difficult - if he was innocent I can see why he should not but if they asked him questions about the day when he saw her and he seemed honest and did not falter  then perhaps it would be proving others like the cousin were telling lies ? We had watched him through the documentary but the jury had not even heard him speak really and because they came from the area they probably has preconceptions.

Offline Caroline

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Re: Making a Murderer (Netflix)
« Reply #44 on: February 01, 2016, 10:46:AM »
Did anyone see the follow up documentary on Sky (ID) on Saturday night?
100% GUILTY - No doubts!