Author Topic: Should Suffolk Police/Chief Constable Simon Ash be trusted?  (Read 4002 times)

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Stephanie

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Should Suffolk Police/Chief Constable Simon Ash be trusted?
« on: September 12, 2011, 01:06:AM »
The Suffolk Police Force Chief Constable Simon Ash continues to retain the compelling criminal evidence dossiers concerning Europe's finest horse racing and breeding establishment known as the Warren Park Stud and Estate at Warren Hill Newmarket Suffolk. Warren Park as it was known when it was in the ownership of the Gerald Carroll Trust interests has now been revealed as a further documented major victim of forged HM Land Registry Carroll title deeds executed by the international crime syndicate which "triggered" the HSBC Holdings Plc. multi-million dollar multiple criminal seizure operations pursuant to major divisions of the Carroll Global Corporation's billion dollar world wide empire in the United Kingdom's largest ever white collar organised crime tax evasion in modern economic history.

http://www.blogtopsites.com/outpost/1b0faeaee00ff3930bf973cd1c904aca

Stephanie

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Re: Should Suffolk Police/Chief Constable Simon Ash be trusted?
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2011, 01:36:AM »
Suffolk Police Force "Vanishing Europe's Centre of Racing Newmarket" Case
Posted on Apr 20, 2010 under General

The Carroll Foundation Trust Case took a further twist with new revelations which now involve yet another police force in this ongoing massive white collar organised crime tax evasion and corruption case. Sources close to the Police Authorities have confirmed that the Suffolk Police Force Chief Constable Simon Ash continues to retain the compelling criminal evidence dossiers concerning Europe's finest horse racing and breeding establishment known as the Warren Park Stud and Estate at Warren Hill Newmarket Suffolk. Warren Park as it was known when it was owned by the Gerald Carroll Trust world wide interests has now been revealed as a further named victim of forged HM Land Registry Carroll Trust title deeds executed by the Goodman Derrick Crime Syndicate which resulted in the HSBC Holdings multi-million pound criminal seizure operations.

UK Government Whitehall sources have confirmed that the Insolvency Agency Inspector-General Stephen Speed and the Royal Courts of Justice "court appointed person" Paul Titherington retain a complete lockdown of the Carroll Trust Case. It is thought that the forensics include GJH Carroll forged signatures specimen exhibits and dummy Carroll Trust Corporations fraudulent filings at Companies House Cardiff which are directly linked to the Warren Park fraud case. The Kingston Smith Edward Robinson & Co Carroll Trust "audit trail lockdown" bundle of the criminal liquidation offences also embrace the Warren Park criminal evidential material.

Further shocking developments surround the Kent Police Authority chairperson Ann Barnes and the former Chief Constable Mike Fuller who are now the subject of serious ongoing criminal allegations involving the theft of US Anglo-Irish Carroll Trust national treasures and cover up attempts. It has been revealed in this bizzare musical chairs merry-go-round that Simon Ash the present Chief Officer of the Suffolk Police Constabulary was a former senior Kent Police officer before his appointment with the Suffolk Police Authority. It is understood that Ann Barnes has shortlisted Simon Ash to replace Mr Fuller as the new Chief Constable of the Kent Police in the face of mounting public outrage with delays to final action being taken in the Carroll Trust Public Interests Case.

The Carroll Foundation Charitable Trust is the centre of Britain's longest running largest criminal conspiracy and corruption scandal in modern economic history. The case dossiers embracing the one billion dollars embezzlement of funds liquidation of assets on a world wide basis are held within a complete "lockdown" at the FBI Washington DC field office and the Metropolitan Police Scotland Yard under the supervision of Sir Paul Stephenson QPM.

http://www.mouthshut.com/carrolltrust/diary/3

Stephanie

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Re: Should Suffolk Police/Chief Constable Simon Ash be trusted?
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2011, 01:49:AM »
Stephen Green the chairman of HSBC Europe’s largest bank together with named officers of the banks offshore operations are the subject of major criminal allegations of conspiracy to defraud racketeering money laundering offshore tax evasion in Britain’s longest running largest organised criminal conspiracy corruption case.

Sources close to the Carroll Foundation Charitable Trust board of trustees have confirmed that compelling criminal evidence material has been submitted to Scotland Yard and the FBI surrounding the fraudulent incorporation of dummy Gerald Carroll Trust HSBC bank accounts and the resultant embezzlement of over $150,000,000, (one hundred and fifty million dollars) of Carrol
View next photo l Trust liquid funds located and held in offshore tax havens within the framework of an international criminal syndicate operation.

The Carroll Foundation Trust one billion dollars - CROSS BORDER - international criminal syndicate case is currently being retained within a - LOCKDOWN - at the US Department of Justice FBI Washington DC Field Office USA - Britain’s Attorney Generals Office under the supervision of the Rt Hon Baroness Scotland QC with the Metropolitan Police Scotland Yard Westminster London UK.

http://www.mouthshut.com/review/HSBC-Private-Equity-review-unrruqomsm

Stephanie

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Re: Should Suffolk Police/Chief Constable Simon Ash be trusted?
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2011, 01:54:AM »
Simon Ash - Chief Constable of Suffolk Police

Stephanie

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Re: Should Suffolk Police/Chief Constable Simon Ash be trusted?
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2011, 01:56:AM »
Detective Superintendent Roy Lambert
Police obtained a journalist's private mobile phone records in a bid to discover his sources, it emerged today.
Detective Superintendent Roy Lambert of Suffolk Police obtained the mobile phone records of East Anglian Daily Times reporter Mark Bulstrode, 26, after he approached the force with information about the reopening of an historic investigation that was not public knowledge.
The newspaper agreed not to publish anything about the inquiry because of its sensitive nature, but the officer was concerned how Bulstrode had found out about the case and obtained his mobile phone records.
The force admitted it held records of telephone calls made by Bulstrode after a request was made under the Data Protection Act, the newspaper reported today.
EADT editor Terry Hunt said: "I find this very disturbing. For Suffolk Police to go so far as to obtain the private phone records of a journalist - after his newspaper has agreed not to publish the story - raises all sorts of concerns. I will be a making a formal complaint to the Chief Constable."
'Outrage'
Bob Satchwell, executive director of the Society of Editors, told the newspaper: "It's just an outrage that they (the police) should use powers that should be reserved for serious criminal investigations to try to find out how the media is getting its information. They should have better things to do."
He said he would be taking the case up with Government Ministers.
A Suffolk Police spokesman said the action was not directed at the newspaper, but was taken "to establish if any officer was unlawfully disclosing information which could have resulted in them perverting the course of justice or committing an offence of misconduct in public office".
"There was concern that the disclosure of information could have jeopardised an investigation into a serious crime, potentially resulting in an offender evading justice."
He added that the application to obtain the phone records would have gone through a "rigorous process" within the force to ensure it was justified.
Officers are permitted to obtain such information if they believe a criminal offence has taken place.
The spokesman said no criminal charges have resulted from the investigation - although a serving police employee has been given "words of advice


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-419986/Anger-police-obtain-journalists-mobile-records-discover-source.html#ixzz1XhAuug6j

Stephanie

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Re: Should Suffolk Police/Chief Constable Simon Ash be trusted?
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2011, 01:58:AM »
Now retired - Detective Superintendent Roy Lambert

Stephanie

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Re: Should Suffolk Police/Chief Constable Simon Ash be trusted?
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2011, 02:00:AM »
 
Police promise swift action
Tuesday, December 5, 2006
11.59 PM

POLICE have today pledged to do try to answer a series of questions submitted by The Evening Star in the wake of a top detective snooping into a journalist's private mobile phone records.

POLICE have today pledged to do try to answer a series of questions submitted by The Evening Star in the wake of a top detective snooping into a journalist's private mobile phone records.

The Star took the unusual step on Friday of demanding an inquiry into Suffolk police after detective superintendent Roy Lambert authorised a search of the phone records of former Evening Star reporter Mark Bulstrode.

Police were concerned about information Mr Bulstrode had obtained about an inquiry in Ipswich which goes back two decades and how he got tipped-off.

In response The Star put ten questions to police in an attempt to get to the bottom of what happened.

A spokesman for Suffolk police today said it would take a few days to get a response together.

The spokesman said: “We have now received the questions formally from The Evening Star.

“We will look at them individually and our aim will be to provide wherever possible any information that we can.”

News that Mr Bulstrode's private phone records were accessed has been met with concern from civil liberty groups.

Mark Wallace, campaign manager for The Freedom Association said he was concerned that police would apparently rather pry into the private matters of a journalist rather than focus on criminals getting away with crimes.

Meanwhile Bob Satchwell, executive director of the Society of Editors, has described the situation as outrageous and is to raise the matter with Government.

After receiving information from a source Mr Bulstrode approached Suffolk police's press office to inquire about a “cold case” but was asked not to publish anything because it could jeopardise the investigation.

Despite agreeing to this, Det Supt Lambert then obtained Mr Bulstrode's private phone records to find his source.

A member of police staff was then given “words of advice”

Mr Bulstrode, 26, who now works for The Star's sister paper, The East Anglian Daily Times, said he discovered his phone records had been obtained after making a request under the Data Protection Act.


Is it acceptable for the police to snoop on mobile phone records? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN or e-mail eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk


The questions:

1. Who obtained the confidential phone records of former Evening Star journalist Mark Bulstrode?

2. Who sanctioned this? Did the officer concerned refer this matter to the chief constable or any other senior officer?

3. What is the process under which such checks are made?

4. How many other journalists - Evening Star or otherwise - working in Suffolk have had their home or mobile phone records checked by Suffolk Police in the last six years, ie since 2000?

5. Are there any ongoing inquiries in which journalists working in Suffolk have had their phone records, home or mobile checked?

6. Have any journalists working in Suffolk had their telephone conversations taped or recorded in any way in the last six years.

7. Did the police press office assist the checking of reporter Mr Bulstrode's phone records in any way? Did the press office pass on Mr Bulstrode's mobile phone number to those involved in the investigation?

8. How many home or mobile phone records were checked in the years 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2006?

9. Is Suffolk Constabulary holding an official inquiry into the case?

10. Will Suffolk review its policy as a result of this case - or is it business as usual?

http://www.eveningstar.co.uk/news/police_promise_swift_action_1_111764?ot=archant.PrintFriendlyPageLayout.ot