Author Topic: The COVID-19 virus in the UK  (Read 6620 times)

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Offline Reader

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The COVID-19 virus in the UK
« on: March 10, 2020, 10:42:PM »
The total number of reported cases in the UK is doubling every two days on average (based on counts published this month). This growth rate must reduce within 4 weeks, else the total would exceed the current size of the UK population. So why is the government currently speculating about a period of two weeks? My best guess is that their "expert" advisers simply halved the maximum period of 4 weeks at the current growth rate.

By the way, the latest news is that Nadine Dorries, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, has been diagnosed as having contracted the virus. She was in a meeting with the PM on Thursday, 5th March, the day before noticing she felt unwell.

Online Roch

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Re: The COVID-19 virus in the UK
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2020, 01:29:PM »
The total number of reported cases in the UK is doubling every two days on average (based on counts published this month). This growth rate must reduce within 4 weeks, else the total would exceed the current size of the UK population. So why is the government currently speculating about a period of two weeks? My best guess is that their "expert" advisers simply halved the maximum period of 4 weeks at the current growth rate.

By the way, the latest news is that Nadine Dorries, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, has been diagnosed as having contracted the virus. She was in a meeting with the PM on Thursday, 5th March, the day before noticing she felt unwell.

The government response to the Covid 19 threat seems to be quite a serious undertaking. There's an awful lot of contingency planning taking place. I think people are genuinely shocked at how contagious it is. I wonder what is really happening in parts of the world where the virus had already got a foothold before the seriousness of it was properly realised.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2020, 01:30:PM by Roch »

Offline Steve_uk

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Re: The COVID-19 virus in the UK
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2020, 09:00:PM »
I am sick and tired of these animal markets in China (palm civets, snakes, bats, pangolins), which have once again created a pandemic across the globe. It is possible that we will never be rid of the coronavirus, and like the 2003 SARS virus, the swine flu of 2009 and MERS of 2012 will become routine with anti-viral drugs and a possible vaccine our only defence against death.

Offline lookout

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Re: The COVID-19 virus in the UK
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2020, 11:05:AM »
In 1957 I was a cadet nurse ( trainee ) working on a ward when Asian 'flu hit the UK. Thousands died globally and about 4,000 died here in the UK. I was unfortunately infected, naturally, because of being in the thick of it and unfortunately hospitalized myself, next to a young girl of 19 who sadly died overnight.
This was a category 2 pandemic and a vaccine was quickly sought where you had to have 2 jabs within the space of 2 or 3 weeks.
This also originated in China and the cause was birds, I think. Symptoms seemed to have been similar and affected the chest and lungs leading to pneumonia. With pneumonia we also now have sepsis in our midst and in Australia, those who've died were men in their 50's and those without underlying health problems, ages in particular are 40's 50's and 60's. 

Offline buddy

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Re: The COVID-19 virus in the UK
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2020, 04:59:PM »
Why no reported cases in Russia. It is well known the poisoning they committed in this country.

Offline lookout

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Re: The COVID-19 virus in the UK
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2020, 05:26:PM »
I don't think there are many buddy and those who have tested positive have probably been to an infected country. They're very likely shot on the spot which is why we haven't heard anything  :)) :)) :)) :))

Offline David1819

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Re: The COVID-19 virus in the UK
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2020, 10:06:PM »
Why no reported cases in Russia. It is well known the poisoning they committed in this country.

They have 28 confirmed cases so far.

https://www.statista.com/statistics/1102935/coronavirus-cases-by-region-in-russia/

Offline nugnug

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    • http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&ved=0CDMQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fjohnnyvoid.wordpress.com%2F&ei=WTdUUo3IM6mY0QWYz4GADg&usg=AFQjCNE-8xtZuPAZ52VkntYOokH5da5MIA&bvm=bv.5353710
Re: The COVID-19 virus in the UK
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2020, 11:43:PM »
Why no reported cases in Russia. It is well known the poisoning they committed in this country.

i think russia is a bit to big for it to spread very far.

Offline Steve_uk

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Re: The COVID-19 virus in the UK
« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2020, 09:18:PM »
In 1957 I was a cadet nurse ( trainee ) working on a ward when Asian 'flu hit the UK. Thousands died globally and about 4,000 died here in the UK. I was unfortunately infected, naturally, because of being in the thick of it and unfortunately hospitalized myself, next to a young girl of 19 who sadly died overnight.
This was a category 2 pandemic and a vaccine was quickly sought where you had to have 2 jabs within the space of 2 or 3 weeks.
This also originated in China and the cause was birds, I think. Symptoms seemed to have been similar and affected the chest and lungs leading to pneumonia. With pneumonia we also now have sepsis in our midst and in Australia, those who've died were men in their 50's and those without underlying health problems, ages in particular are 40's 50's and 60's.
I talked to a lady a few days ago who told me she had contracted Asian flu in 1960 and nearly died. She cares for her husband now, who is in a wheelchair, they are both retired and must be feeling particularly vulnerable.

Offline lookout

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Re: The COVID-19 virus in the UK
« Reply #9 on: March 14, 2020, 01:20:PM »
I talked to a lady a few days ago who told me she had contracted Asian flu in 1960 and nearly died. She cares for her husband now, who is in a wheelchair, they are both retired and must be feeling particularly vulnerable.




These type of viruses sadly don't give any immunity if they strike again as our antibodies don't recognise what they're fighting against. Because I also contracted Asian 'flu in 1957 and also with age and having had the 'flu-jab last year, like many, we are vulnerable as only a jab for a specific virus such as this would offer protection of sorts.

Unfortunately I was hospitalized a week before Christmas and picked up a " bug " ( unknowingly ) as it must have incubated during the Christmas period and during New Year I became pretty ill with symptoms described as with this virus. I'd never had a cough in my life, but had one with breathing difficulties which was much like a case of whooping cough that I couldn't get my breath, and slept, when I could, with the window wide open for air.
I also had a hand fan which I wafted to get my breath whilst coughing. I didn't seek help but stayed indoors for most of January and it was well into February that I began to feel human. In all my life I'd never felt so ill and I'm pretty robust most of the time, thankfully.

At the time I was in hospital two women had arrived from abroad and both were coughing and very ill in a bay opposite to where I was. Staff had quickly donned masks/gloves and plastic aprons and immediately moved me further down the resus ward. I swear to this day it was this virus !!  It's a killer.

I'm living like a hermit presently but have everything I need and just using common sense which is all you can do.
You'll have to take care Steve being amongst the pupils.

Offline Reader

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Re: The COVID-19 virus in the UK
« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2020, 01:33:PM »
They have 28 confirmed cases so far.
Now, 2 days later, Russia has 48 confirmed cases.

In the UK, the number of recorded cases is doubling in under 4 days and tripling in under 6 days, so there could be a million cases 36 days from now. However, official figures may be replaced by official guesses well before that.

Edit: the above was being cautious - a million cases could be reached 10 days earlier, after 10 thousand reached next weekend.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2020, 08:50:PM by Reader »

Offline Steve_uk

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Re: The COVID-19 virus in the UK
« Reply #11 on: March 14, 2020, 02:43:PM »



These type of viruses sadly don't give any immunity if they strike again as our antibodies don't recognise what they're fighting against. Because I also contracted Asian 'flu in 1957 and also with age and having had the 'flu-jab last year, like many, we are vulnerable as only a jab for a specific virus such as this would offer protection of sorts.

Unfortunately I was hospitalized a week before Christmas and picked up a " bug " ( unknowingly ) as it must have incubated during the Christmas period and during New Year I became pretty ill with symptoms described as with this virus. I'd never had a cough in my life, but had one with breathing difficulties which was much like a case of whooping cough that I couldn't get my breath, and slept, when I could, with the window wide open for air.
I also had a hand fan which I wafted to get my breath whilst coughing. I didn't seek help but stayed indoors for most of January and it was well into February that I began to feel human. In all my life I'd never felt so ill and I'm pretty robust most of the time, thankfully.

At the time I was in hospital two women had arrived from abroad and both were coughing and very ill in a bay opposite to where I was. Staff had quickly donned masks/gloves and plastic aprons and immediately moved me further down the resus ward. I swear to this day it was this virus !!  It's a killer.

I'm living like a hermit presently but have everything I need and just using common sense which is all you can do.
You'll have to take care Steve being amongst the pupils.
I'm very sorry to hear that lookout. I also had the flu a couple of weeks ago though I'm not sure whether it was the coronavirus. The shivering soon disappeared but the cough and phlegm were harder to shake off. It's only the third time I was off work for any length of time: the other times were the winter of 1989/90 and 1993/4.

I suppose this "herd immunity" approach has been recommended by the top advisors, though it seems rather harsh as I would have thought the young and fit are placed better to shake it off rather than the old and vulnerable.


Offline lookout

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Re: The COVID-19 virus in the UK
« Reply #12 on: March 14, 2020, 04:31:PM »
I'm very sorry to hear that lookout. I also had the flu a couple of weeks ago though I'm not sure whether it was the coronavirus. The shivering soon disappeared but the cough and phlegm were harder to shake off. It's only the third time I was off work for any length of time: the other times were the winter of 1989/90 and 1993/4.

I suppose this "herd immunity" approach has been recommended by the top advisors, though it seems rather harsh as I would have thought the young and fit are placed better to shake it off rather than the old and vulnerable.





Needless to say although I'm fit enough for my years, that bout of " whatever " left its mark in that my walking distance hasn't been the same up to now but it will hopefully improve as the weather warms up.
It was definitely a chest infection of sorts, something I'd never had since 1957, but I suppose with me being older it hit me more so.

I was actually only in hospital for 6 hours while being stabilized for a rapid heartbeat  ( A/F ) and underwent a series of tests all of which were normal----thank goodness, but still a scary time.

I was never off sick at work and used to get a yearly bonus at work ( NHS ) for attendance.

The " herd immunity " was practiced years ago when childhood diseases were in progress. If the kid next door had chickenpox we were all allowed to play together. Measles and mumps the same. German measles too.
Guess who didn't catch chickenpox   ? I remained a carrier but had a shingles jab last year to be on the safe side.

Offline maggie

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Re: The COVID-19 virus in the UK
« Reply #13 on: March 14, 2020, 05:28:PM »




Needless to say although I'm fit enough for my years, that bout of " whatever " left its mark in that my walking distance hasn't been the same up to now but it will hopefully improve as the weather warms up.
It was definitely a chest infection of sorts, something I'd never had since 1957, but I suppose with me being older it hit me more so.

I was actually only in hospital for 6 hours while being stabilized for a rapid heartbeat  ( A/F ) and underwent a series of tests all of which were normal----thank goodness, but still a scary time.

I was never off sick at work and used to get a yearly bonus at work ( NHS ) for attendance.

The " herd immunity " was practiced years ago when childhood diseases were in progress. If the kid next door had chickenpox we were all allowed to play together. Measles and mumps the same. German measles too.
Guess who didn't catch chickenpox   ? I remained a carrier but had a shingles jab last year to be on the safe side.
Hi Lookout so sorry you have been so ill.  Keep safe. X

Offline Steve_uk

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Re: The COVID-19 virus in the UK
« Reply #14 on: March 16, 2020, 10:25:PM »
The over-70s are to be quarantined, so it appears..https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-51895873